October 18, 2019

Town Council receives update on Watershed Management Plan and Long-Range Planning Committee Report

By Lorraine Glowczak

The Windham Town Council held a workshop on Tuesday evening, October 15 at 6:30 p.m. at the Town Hall in the Council Chambers room. The agenda items included reports from the Highland Lake Leadership Team (HLLT) as well from the Long Range Planning Committee.

Highland Lake residents are invited to a public meeting on
Oct. 23 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Cornerstone Church
Image by Julia Ellsworth
Gretchen Anderson and Heather True from HLLT updated the Council on the watershed management plan with the intention to reduce the pollutants at Highland Lake, which has experienced high levels of phosphorus causing the lake to be at-risk. They reported on various action items that include, but are not limited to the following:

*Provide technical assistance to homeowners with polluted runoff sites or inadequate buffers to prompt installation of conservation practices on their own.
*Install conservation practices to address polluted runoff sites identified on town roads and other town-owned property.
*Seek local sponsorships for supplies and or grant funding to address low priority/small polluted runoff sites.
*Enhance/encourage ongoing private road maintenance.
*Contact homeowners with high-risk systems to encourage advanced inspections.
*Host septic system care workshops and other educational workshops.

There will be a public meeting for Highland Lake residents that will be held at the Cornerstone Church, 48 Cottage Road on Wednesday, October 23 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Next on the agenda was a report from the Long-Range Planning Committee (LRPC). Committee members, Amanda Lessard and Ben Smith spoke about town zoning ordinances with suggested ways to make them more in compliance with town policy, directing new residential growth away from rural areas.

As stated in the packet/letter provided to the Town Council, “LRPC took the public input [from the July from the community workshops along with the public input from the Comprehensive Planning process to develop an approach to rezoning the Farm and Farm Residential zoning districts that:

• Considers that there are important rural areas in Windham where open space should be
preserved and ensures that large lots are available for those rural uses that obtain their
value from the land.
• Has other areas that will continue to allow for lower density residential development that
would be protected from some of the more incompatible rural uses like mineral
extraction, sawmills, piggeries, etc.
• Creates two new zoning districts that have greater differences in the types of allowed
uses and the number of homes that could be built, and
• Separates net density from minimum lot size and proposes a maximum lot size in order
to create large blocks land to remain undeveloped or be used for other non-residential
rural land uses.

Also discussed were issues surrounding conservation subdivisions (a design strategy that attempts to preserve undivided, buildable tracts of land as communal open space for residents) and impact fees (a fee imposed on a new or proposed development project to pay for all or a portion of the costs of providing public services to the new development).

When Lessard and Smith completed their report, they asked for guidance on the LRPC should proceed. After discussion, it was decided that the Council and LRPC would need to meet within the next month or two to help expedite the issues of zoning, growth and development.

For full detail of this meeting, please visit the town website at www.windhammaine.us.

Charles Hawkins steps out of Town Council race

By Lorraine Glowczak

Charles Hawkins announced at a press conference held on Tuesday, October 15th at 5:30 p.m. that he would be stepping down as a candidate for Town Council. The announcement was made in front of the Windham Town Hall.

“I ran for Town Council last year, pointing out the same issues, to which they’ve only gotten worse,
Charles Hawkins
in my opinion,” began Hawkins, referring to his disappointment over town leadership.

“I feel so strongly about this that I’m dropping out of this year’s election and encouraging my supporters to vote for and put their trust behind Dave Douglass. Windham needs competent leaders to represent our future. I love this town and want to see it flourish and because of that, I want to put the town’s issues ahead of my own.”

Hawkins entered the race this fall and was running for the At-Large seat. Candidates also running for this position are current Town Councilor Donna Chapman and David Douglass.  Hawkins pointed out in his announcement that the current issues the town faces are not right or left and the solutions are not black or white.  As a result, he recommended that everyone work together to find solutions and accomplish goals. He asked everyone present to get out to vote on November 5th, encouraging his supporters to vote for David Douglass and Nick Kalogerakis.

“That is an amazing way to put the town ahead of yourself,” Town Councilor Jarrod Maxfield said after Hawkins’ announcement. “I am fully supporting David Douglass and Nick Kalogerakis. It is important that we have a unified council who can be prepared and professional. I have the utmost confidence that those are the two candidates to get this done.”

Maxfield continued by stating some of the issues facing the town, which include investing in ourselves, redeveloping downtown areas, aging in place, and focus on the community center. “Whether you have been here for five days or 50 years, everyone deserves the same representation and these candidates will do that for you.” Maxfield is running unopposed for the North seat.

“Windham is at a crossroads and we need a plan for the future,” Stated David Nadeau, who is also supporting Douglass and Kalogerakis. “We need to come up with creative ideas to move forward. Please come out to vote – that is all I’m asking you to do.”

Town Councilor, Tim Nangle also spoke for the two candidates, stating that this election is critical. “We need to move forward in a deliberate way, and I support David Douglass and Nicholas Kalogerakis – so we need you to come out to vote on November 5th”.

Douglass and Kalogerakis also responded to Hawkins’ announcement.  “Will, I am truly humbled by what you have done,” Douglass began. “I respect your position because we all feel the same way. This is about supporting the town of Windham and doing what’s best for the town. I’m not saying I’m the best candidate, but Charles has generously bowed out and is throwing his support behind Nick and I.”

Kalogerakis stated that he was deeply moved by Hawkins’ decision to step out of the race. “You did put the town before yourself today. We need more of that in this town,” he stated, and continued by thanking all those who support him “We have a big task ahead of us. It’s time for action. You must find a way to get out and vote. We have to work together, even if we disagree. Be professional and above all, put the town first. I can’t stress enough – we need votes, we need votes, we need votes.”

Donna Chapman and Robert Muir, current councilors and candidates were not present for this announcement to publicly make comments.

Voting will be open on Tuesday, November 5th, at the Windham High School Gym, 406 Gray Road from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Absentee ballots are available now. For more information on obtaining an absentee ballot call Town Clerk Linda Morrell at 207-892-1900 or go into the office Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

October 11, 2019

Katahdin Program chefs to prepare next RVCC free community dinner


As part of their Culinary Arts and Gardening Program, the students of The Katahdin Program, Windham High School’s alternative learning initiative, have volunteered to plan and prepare a delicious dinner for the next Raymond Village Community Church (RVCC) free community meal. Located at 27 Main Street in Raymond, the meal will be hosted by the church on Thursday, October 17 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

“We are so excited to have this relationship with the staff and students of the Katahdin Program.”, said RVCC Pastor Rev. Nancy Foran.  “It is a win-win for both parties. The kids will have an interesting educational challenge and an opportunity to showcase their talents, their skills, and the program of which they are a part. 

Everyone in the local community has the chance to enjoy an excellent meal of beef stew, home-made bread, salad and dessert. In the process, people can demonstrate their support and appreciation for this unique and valuable educational initiative.” 
https://bbcultivation.com/
RVCC hopes that everyone from Raymond, Windham, and beyond will come to be guests of these marvelous young people.

There have been many questions about whether the free community meals will continue after their successful introduction in the spring. RVCC intends to continue these free community meals indefinitely.

The Katahdin Program utilizes the classroom, the outdoors and the greater community to provide alternative education programming for students, grades nine through 12, in the RSU14 Windham/Raymond school district. The program recognizes that all learners have strengths, assets, and interests. Katahdin staff believe that every individual is an important part of the learning community, whose core values are integrity, safety, respect, responsibility, and kindness.

https://www.miracle-ear.com/locations/windham-me/?utm_source=Print&utm_campaign=Links&utm_medium=Short+URLsFor further information about RVCC and Free Community Meals, email Rev. Foran at nancy1@maine.rr.com, or call the Church at 655-7749. 

To learn more about the Katahdin Program, go to their website at: https://www.katahdinprogram.org.

RVCC: Small Church, BIG Heart!

Raymond Village Community Church is a United Church of Christ congregation.  It is a diverse faith community embracing tolerance, committed to missions and outreach, singing joyfully, and welcoming all people no matter who they are, or where they are on their faith journey.  For more information about RVCC, contact Rev. Nancy Foran, Pastor, at 655-7749 or nancy1@maine.rr.com

Little Sebago Lake Association successfully keeps milfoil under control

LSLA President Pam Wilkinson and her daughter Megan
inspect the milfoil.
By Lorraine Glowczak

According to the Lakes Environmental Association (LEA) website, watermilfoils are rooted, submerged aquatic plants found naturally in lakes and streams. Five varieties of watermilfoils are native to Maine and are part of the natural lake ecosystem. Two non-native watermilfoils threaten the quality of Maine fresh waters; Variable leaf milfoil (myriophyllum heterophyllum) is already present in 27 Maine lakes systems, including streams. Eurasian watermilfoil (myriophyllum spicatum), the more aggressive colonizer of the two, has been found in several Maine water bodies.

The LEA website also states that many invasive aquatic plants were first transported as ornamental
aquarium plants. When aquaria were emptied into lakes or streams, the plants proliferated in their new environment. Variable leaf milfoil was first recorded in Maine in 1970 in Sebago Lake.

Perhaps from there and with the addition of a boat ramp, variable leaf milfoil found its way to Little Sebago Lake. It was in the late 1990s when the first reports came in that Little Sebago was in trouble.

https://www.egcu.org/rec"Areas of the lake were filled with milfoil and we knew we had to do something about it immediately,” stated the President of the Little Sebago Lake Association (LSLA) Pam Wilkinson. 

“After a couple of years of hand pulling with volunteers, we knew this was not the best approach.
Luckily, we had an engineer in our association who developed a pontoon boat in such a way that, with using the help of a professional diver, we are able to remove the milfoil without having to wait for an answer on what to do.”

The suction dredge has an innovative ‘vacuum’ type Venturi pump attached to a 50 foot hose that their professional diver, Jim MacNaught, uses to extract the milfoil as he dives down to pull the invasive plant roots from the lake floor. The milfoil then flows through the hose and into a trough on the boat. The trough has a set of four gates that allows the milfoil to drop into onion bags twice filtering the water before going back into the lake. The boat has become a model that LEA and other lake associations have re-developed to fit their needs in order to work on their own milfoil extraction.

“When we began removing the milfoil, we were removing up to 100 bags a day,” Wilkinson explained. “Now, 20 years later, we are down to maybe six or seven bags a day. At its peak in 2008-2010 we removed over 1,700 bags each year. In the last few years we have removed about 170 bags each year and it is declining.  It’s gone from being a plant that could be found almost everywhere in the lake to a search and retrieve method rotating periodically to each of the 30 locations on the lake. It has become that sparse.”
Once the milfoil is removed, it is taken to be used as compost. In recent years, co-milfoil director, Tim Greer, personally takes it to the town of Gray’s compost – where townspeople can use the nutrient rich compost in their gardens.

The Maine DEP recently visited Little Sebago and complimented on the work the association has put forth. Although very proud of their accomplishments, Wilkinson warns that if left unchecked, milfoil can return in an aggressive manner, choking the lake from its natural habitat.  Other invasive threats and algae occurrences are concerns on the horizon. Clearing of vegetation and adding sand threatens the nutrient balance of the lake. People should take measures to enhance their shorelines to decrease runoff into the lake.  “It can all flip around in just one summer.”  

Variable leaf and Eurasian milfoil can reproduce by fragmentation. LEA explains that when a
disturbance like a motorboat or fishing lure passes through a colony of plants, the chopped-up pieces are each capable of forming a new plant. Milfoil can move from lake to lake on a propeller, trailer, fishing gear or anchor. “It can even be transferred from lake to lake by a bird,” Wilkinson said.

The dense growth and rapid spread of milfoil along lake shores dramatically impedes swimming and fishing. This factor hinders the value of the lakes, both in terms of home property values and tourism dollars that the state depends upon every year. But perhaps more importantly are the ecological and environmental impacts these invasive plants have on the lake.
http://www.hallimplementco.com/
LEA website states, “Ecological impacts of invasive plants are difficult to enumerate. The most   Invasive plants like variable leaf milfoil are free from their natural competitors and can out compete native plants for space and sunlight.
obvious impact they have upon native communities is out competition. In an organism’s native habitat its growth and spread are balanced by other organisms that have evolved to compete with or eat it.

The implications of the loss of native plants are far reaching. Native plants act as both a food source and habitat. By changing the available habitat and food source, invasive plants can drastically alter delicate relationships in the food web.”

Wilkinson, who has been diligently leading the milfoil removal program with the aid of Tim Greer, reminds lake residents that the lake association can always use help in identifying milfoil around the lakefront areas. “We provide buoys for all residents,” began Wilkinson. “If a resident sees a milfoil plant – all they need to do is place a buoy near the area and let us know and we will come and remove it if it is not a native plant. We want to take the plant from the lake as quickly as possible and having residents help us identify where a new plant is will keep the lake clear of this invasive plant.”

Wilkinson’s dedication to this cause is not going unnoticed. “She has been a long-time leader and she is someone that people look up to,” stated Jim McBride, treasurer of the association. “She has been on the board for 30 years, over 10 years of which she has been president. Her leadership is one of the reasons why we have a beautiful lake for everyone to enjoy.”

To become more knowledgeable or to contact a plant patroller visit www.lakestewardsofmaine.org

Little Sebago Lake residents who wish to learn more about milfoil extraction, help with an adopt a shoreline program or to become an active member in the association, visit littlesebagolake.com, contact Pam Wilkinson at pwilkinson@littlesebagolake.com or call 207.809.4706.

Survey results are in: Windham Age Friendly community forum to begin action planning from feedback

By Lorraine Glowczak

Windham’s Age Friendly Community Committee has completed their first major step in creating a community action plan. On September 13 – the deadline for the survey, the committee received feedback from over 320 individuals to express the types of human service needs experienced by Windham residents.

The results have been tabulated by Patricia Oh, AARP Maine's Age-Friendly Consultant with the help of her intern, Yacov Aviv. All Windham citizens, young and old, are encouraged to join and attend the Community Forum on Monday, October 21 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Windham High School’s Open Cafe to review these initial results. The forum will start the process for developing a community action plan to address needs for older members in the community. Refreshments will be served.

Topics to be discussed will include: Community support, housing, health services, transportation, employment, outdoor spaces and buildings, communication and information.

“We will be discussing what we have learned from the initial survey results and what the needs are for our community to be a successful one for all ages,” stated Deb McAfee, Chair of the Human Advisory Committee. “We will set priorities based upon the feedback received.”

cstlouis@spurwink.orgMcAfee explained that the first 15 minutes of the community forum will consist of sharing the initial results of the survey. “We will then break out into stations in each area that have been addressed from the survey to get a better understanding of the most important needs. From there we will be able be to better create a plan of action to execute those needs.”

Creating a communication hub will be one topic of discussion and will be a focus of the Advisory Committee. “We want to be able to bring all the services that are offered in the Windham area from
various organizations into one place,” McAfee began. “There are many amazing services already being offered in our community, from free Monday Meals offered by area churches to events and services offered by other small organizations and volunteer transportation options – we want to provide an easily accessible communication hub where an individual can easily find services.”

Briefly and according to AARP, to become age friendly “advances efforts to help people live easily and comfortably in their homes and communities as they age. AARP’s presence encourages older adults to take a more active role in their communities and have their voices heard. Initiatives focus on areas such as housing, caregiving, community engagement, volunteering, social inclusion and combating isolation among older citizens.”

https://www.schoolspring.comIn a recent Speak Out session with Rep. Patrick Corey, McAfee expressed the many benefits for becoming an official AARP Age Friendly Community and some of those benefits include:
Access to a global network of participating communities, as well as aging and civil society experts.
Access to key information about the program, such as the latest news and information about best
practices, events, results, challenges and new initiatives.

Opportunities for partnerships with other cities, both domestic and international.
Mentoring and peer-review evaluation by member cities.

Public recognition of the community’s commitment to become more age friendly.
Speaking engagements at conferences and events hosted by AARP and promotion through AARP’s media channels.

Let your voice be heard and be a part of developing a healthy and active age friendly community by attending the October 21st Age Friendly Community Forum.


October 4, 2019

Q & A with the Windham Town Council candidates

The Windham Eagle newspaper sent a questionnaire to all seven Windham Town Council candidates to give them an opportunity to share some of their thoughts, concerns, etc. regarding issues facing Windham. We also wanted to give our Windham readers the opportunity to become informed when they vote on Tuesday, November 5th, at the Windham High School Gym, 406 Gray Road from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Due to newspaper space constraints, each candidate was asked to stay within a certain word count, otherwise, they would have been able to expand upon their thoughts more completely. The answers are their own. The only edits that occurred were grammatical error including proper sentence structure but those are the only changes, if any, that have been made.

If you wish to learn more about the candidates and ask them questions of your own or to gain more information, a candidate forum will take place at the Microtel Inn and Suites at 965 Roosevelt Trail on Thursday, October 10. The candidates will be introduced at 7:45 p.m., followed by a question and answer session. The forum will be hosted by Move Windham Forward.

Donna Chapman
Donna M. Chapman (running for the South seat)
1)Background/personal information to include family, professional memberships, career, volunteer efforts, etc.

I am the mother of two adult daughters and a grandmother. I am a Volunteer 4-H Club Leader for 15 plus years. I volunteer annually for a fundraiser at Camp Sunshine for the True Fans of Elvis which all proceeds go to Camp Sunshine. I am also a Life Member of the Ossippee Valley Fair Association.
I have an associate degree in Behavioral Health and Human Services from SMCC and currently am an Office Assistant.

2) Although there are many, what do you think are the top two most important challenges/issues facing Windham and what do you see as potential ways to rectify or improve those issues?

The two top challenges I see facing Windham are growth and protecting our natural resources. We have five watersheds on a DEP list that are most at risk from new development. We need to be mindful how we develop in order to protect and improve our resources that are in danger. Look at the town, what areas do we want the growth and offer incentives for those willing to develop in those areas. Try making it harder in developing areas that we want to stay open and rural. In North Windham we must have a sewer option to help with the denser population and development without overtaxing residents. We need to increase commercial development to offset our residential tax base. Residential taxes are going up, that becomes a burden to some.

3) Do you believe there are enough transportation options currently available in Windham? If not, do you have ideas or suggestions on how to increase those options?

https://www.schoolspring.comTransportation is not an issue; we have Uber options; we also have the Lakes Region Bus. For the
$9,000.00 fee yearly, I would advocate to change its route to go through South Windham and back into Portland to cover our Village District.

4) What are your thoughts regarding the proposed Windham Community Center? Is it important to our town? Why or why not? If you are for a community center, where do you propose it be built?

Community Center, yes, I support a center. The location is key, if it’s a multi-use facility it can be near the schools or in North Windham. People might disagree with that, but the purpose is supposed to be for everyone. I feel a lot more must be vetted; we may even have to consider a facility like the one in Waterville which is run privately as a non-profit and is extremely successful. The committee has more work ahead of it and I look forward in supporting the committee and its findings.

5) What is the best way for Windham residents to contact you?

Best way to contact me is my home phone 207-893-8584. It is listed on the Town Website as well. 
David Douglass
David P. Douglass (running for At Large seat)
1)Background/personal information to include family, professional memberships, career, volunteer efforts, etc.

I have lived in Windham for 10 years; I chose Windham because it reminded me of where I grew up in NH, the feeling and character. I am a licensed Architect with my own consulting firm based out of my home. I have been a member of the Planning Board since 2012 and Chairman for four to five years now.

2) Although there are many, what do you think are the top two most important challenges/issues facing Windham and what do you see as potential ways to rectify or improve those issues?

I feel that Windham is struggling with growth and leadership. There are a lot of factors with this. We have witnessed unprecedented growth recently and it is causing growing pains for the town and having real quality of life effects on some. While our planning staff is excellent - at the same time planning and directing of growth has not kept up for a number of reasons. We must direct growth to the areas of town that are best suited for it. Additionally, I feel we have long term leaders in town who aren’t rising to the tasks at hand and seem to focus on petty things which is why I am running for the at large seat. I want a cohesive, professional well-educated board that can work together towards common goals.



This is tricky. Transportation is costly and Maine’s rural character doesn’t help. Enhanced public transportation would certainly benefit our community and greater Portland at large. I am a big proponent of traffic improvement. Moving cars in a rural area is critical and I would like to work on how we get in and out of town better as well as around town during tourist season.



I love the idea of a community center, as a design professional I am very familiar with the process of creating community venues and weaving them into the community. The current location seems to be a good one though the lot may not be the best. I feel this is one of many large projects the town needs to undertake. We can’t grow as a town without growing our infrastructure and gathering spaces. I look forward to this developing into a place for all town residents to share.

5) What is the best way for Windham residents to contact you?

Call me – 207-807-6661 or email me at david4windham@gmail.com.

Charles Hawkins
Charles W. Hawkins (running for the At Large seat)

1)Background/personal information to include family, professional memberships, career, volunteer efforts, etc.

I own 3 businesses here in Windham with over 30 employees. I served on Windham’s Marijuana Task Force as vice chair but resigned when I chose to run for town council again. I try to donate to local organizations as much as possible and volunteer my time to the Sebago Lakes Chamber of Commerce in not only events but also on the legislative committee as the Agricultural Business & Market Development Liaison. At home I have a wonderful wife, Melissa and two amazing daughters Kayja (8) and Hazel (3).

2) Although there are many, what do you think are the top two most important
challenges/issues facing Windham and what do you see as potential ways to rectify or
improve those issues?

How to handle Windham’s growth properly and ethics amongst our town officials. I think it would be best to have a community discussion regarding our growth, come up with solutions together as a community, and revise our ordinances where agreed upon. Respectfully I believe the only way to restore ethics amongst our councilors is to change some of the leadership in place to individuals that do not resort to name calling, abuse of power and public insults.

https://www.schoolspring.com3) Do you believe there are enough transportation options currently available in Windham?
If not, do you have ideas or suggestions on how to increase those options?

I have not personally heard of any transportation complaints. I know we have a few options for getting back and forth to Portland but as for getting around Windham I’m not sure what type of improvements we need currently. I’d rather focus on bringing business to Windham in order to create more jobs. Perhaps look at transportation increases when there is a more pressing need.

4) What are your thoughts regarding the proposed Windham Community Center? Is it
important to our town? Why or why not? If you are for a community center, where do
you propose it be built?

I believe a community center is a great idea if and when we can realistically afford It. I’ve heard suggestions of using the middle school once it becomes vacant. If the middle school actually does become available, I think a community center there would be an excellent idea.

5) What is the best way for Windham residents to contact you?

Vote4windham.com where I receive all comments posted on any issue or at talktome@charleshawkins.us 
  
Nick Kalogerakis
Nicholas Kalogerakis (running for South seat)


1) Background/personal information to include family, professional memberships, career, volunteer efforts, etc.

I have lived in Windham since 2005 to raise my two children, Luke and Sophia, in a rural town. In 2015, I started my company “Vision Coaching and Consulting” which is located right here in Windham. I volunteered with the Dream Factory and Camp Sunshine. Currently I serve on the Planning Board- since 2016, the Windham Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) since 2016 and the Long-Range Planning Committee since 2017.

2) Although there are many, what do you think are the top two most important
challenges/issues facing Windham and what do you see as potential ways to rectify or
improve those issues?

Windham is one of the fastest growing towns in Maine! As a town we have reacted slowly. We are in a reactive state. The growth has not been balanced, it’s primarily residential and commercial is almost nonexistent comparatively.  This has become stressful and a burden for town services, and school populations. While we wait for some reaction, I think that we could have implemented some fees. In addition to Parks and Recreation fees, a North Windham and Route 302 fees, I would suggest we have a fee for roads and for schools possibly.

Septic systems are also an issue. Septic systems work, but they don’t work when many are close together, as we continue to build at the rate we are, we are putting more and more contaminants in the ground and eventually our soils will not be able to filter them thoroughly, if they aren’t already overwhelmed. With what we see in our water bodies it seems to be happening already.
I am excited about the satellite sewers the WEDC is trying to get off the ground. Although it won’t service the whole town, it’s certainly a start.

3) Do you believe there are enough transportation options currently available in Windham?
If not, do you have ideas or suggestions on how to increase those options?

I think we can expand the Lakes Region Bus routes to have them add more stops. I believe GPCOG has done a lot of research with public transportation and I think working with them and researching the studies they have done might provide some answers. Our population in Maine is aging and we need to ensure we are caring for our elderly.

4) What are your thoughts regarding the proposed Windham Community Center? Is it
important to our town? Why or why not? If you are for a community center, where do
you propose it be built?

Our youth need this type of facility as well as the elderly. The Community Center Committee has done an outstanding job with all the time, effort and most import community meetings to get input from the residents. The next phase is to fundraise and get funding if any is available from grants. I feel the more money we can get the less burden on the taxpayer and that might be the deciding factor here.
I think the current site works well especially after listening to the engineers that have reviewed it and they gave their stamp of approval so far. I would try to add an egress on 302 that heads South to try to ease the traffic burdens that some are mentioning.

What is the best way for Windham residents to contact you?

My email is best. I will get back to them within the day depending on what time it is.
nick@coachingandleading.org or 207-310-1476.

Jarrod Maxfield
Jarrod J. Maxfield (running for the North seat)

1) Background/personal information to include family, professional memberships, career, volunteer efforts, etc.

I am a husband, father and business owner who has lived in Windham since 2011. I have been on the Council one term, since 2016. I am the current Chair of the Appointments Committee. I also serve on the Economic Development Committee and represent Windham on the EcoMaine Board and on the GPCOG Regional Voice Committee.

2) Although there are many, what do you think are the top two most important
challenges/issues facing Windham and what do you see as potential ways to rectify or
improve those issues?

The most important challenge facing Windham is Unity. We are currently a Council and, in many ways, a town divided, but we need to remember that there is much more that unites us than divides us. For example, many residents have been here their entire lives, and some have just arrived and that often creates conflicts regarding change or lack thereof. Let’s find a common thread and start all conversations from there, such as we all love this town and choose to live here. If we can unite on that, then everything else can fall into place such as working on another large challenge, infrastructure. Windham has a history of deferring investment in infrastructure, which means we are not investing in ourselves. Windham of the past and the future is in desperate need of investments such as sewer, water line expansion, broadband expansion, road work and more. This is not a wise course to continue as this lack of investment, while saving us money in the short term, costs us all a lot more in the long run in lost opportunities, lost revenues and the loss of building places in Windham people want to go. We must invest in ourselves.

3) Do you believe there are enough transportation options currently available in Windham?
If not, do you have ideas or suggestions on how to increase those options?

Windham has scarce options for transportation in, around and out of town. This is a challenge we need to address. Our roads are becoming more congested and our Earth more polluted. This is an opportunity to work with surrounding towns on a regional solution. Portland is pushing further out; we need to become connected to services such as Metro. This is important, not just for moving commuters around, but also to help our Seniors age in place. They deserve the ability to have day to day lives and access to the transportation services that will help them achieve that.

4) What are your thoughts regarding the proposed Windham Community Center? Is it
important to our town? Why or why not? If you are for a community center, where do
you propose it be built?

I support the Community Center next to the rotary. It is important to our town to help foster a sense of community, create an accessible, safe place for our children and seniors to recreate and also capture the resident’s dollars currently being spent in other towns and private facilities. Windham is virtually the only town our size not to have a community center, but this is not an inexpensive venture. It must be done with a mix of private donors, town dollars and new revenues. The Council should continue the plan and eventually the voters will ultimately decide.

What is the best way for Windham residents to contact you?

I can be emailed at jarrodmaxfield@windhammaine.us or you can call me anytime at 207-805-7005.

Bob Muir
Robert H. Muir (running for the At Large position)


1)Background/personal information to include family, professional memberships, career, volunteer efforts, etc.

I have lived in Windham for 48 years and have been married to wife, Barbara, for 52 years. We have five cats and a greyhound. I am retired from an IT department and currently work as a range safety officer and pistol instructor. First served on town Council in 2003. I’ve been council chair twice, member of the finance committee, member of the appointments committee and parliamentarian.

2) Although there are many, what do you think are the top two most important
challenges/issues facing Windham and what do you see as potential ways to rectify or
improve those issues?

Growth is a big issue. Development will always occur, however, slowing development does ease the burden on town services and taxpayers so we don’t get hit with many things all at once. A lot has been said about rural Windham. I do not feel that cluster subdivisions or whatever term is used helps the rural character of Windham. We have guidelines for the size of lots in our various zones and I think we should stick to those guidelines. This in itself will slow growth. I think eliminating cluster subdivisions would go a long way toward easing growth.

Private roads are another big issue facing the town. I do not agree with some of the changes that have been proposed. We must find a way to help the person who only has a few acres and wishes to break off a lot or two. There are certain standards for private roads but requiring someone to improve an additional 200 feet or more could be the difference between developing those lots or not. One thing I heard loud and clear from people, it is your land and you want the right to decide how that land will be used.

3) Do you believe there are enough transportation options currently available in Windham?
If not, do you have ideas or suggestions on how to increase those options?

Transportation in Windham especially areas outside of North Windham are limited. Senior citizens and others who do not have access to their own transportation would probably like to visit North Windham. Parks and Recreation does provide transportation for shopping at scheduled times. Public transportation is usually subsidized in part or full by a community. I am certainly willing to discuss the issue keeping in mind that it would be a challenge.

4) What are your thoughts regarding the proposed Windham Community Center? Is it
important to our town? Why or why not? If you are for a community center, where do
you propose it be built?

A community center is a nice idea, however, as with any other project it’s in the funding. The committee working on this needs to come up with a complete financial plan listing how a center would be paid for. This includes cleaning and maintenance staff, lifeguards and other supervisory personnel. There needs to be space for senior citizens, and it must be easily accessible to them. The committee needs to explore all options for a site location. On-site parking would be a must-have to eliminate any congestion on existing roads. I am looking forward to reading their financial plan.

5) What is the best way for Windham residents to contact you?

My phone number is 892-6096. Please leave a message and I will call you back.

Gartay Yekeh
Gartay A. Yekeh (running for South seat)

1)Background/personal information to include family, professional memberships, career, volunteer efforts, etc.

I am 47 and live in Windham with my four children and spouse. I am a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Maine Department of Labor. I have a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science & International Studies (2011) from USM and a Master of Business Administration (MBA) (2015), from SNHU, Hooksett, NH. I am Founder/CEO, Gbokpasom Inc, a State of Maine Charted and IRS 501c3 nonprofit organization working to support street children and orphans in Liberia, West Africa.

2) Although there are many, what do you think are the top two most important challenges/issues facing Windham and what do you see as potential ways to rectify or improve those issues?

Important issues that I believe facing Windham are the kind of rapid growth that is moving stealthily in all parts of Windham and the Town’s ability to sustain such growth with environmental sustainability. I believe the Town will require new ideas, fast thinking and long-term strategic planning that would concentrate on sustainable financial and environmental support. Windham is growing; we need to approach such with firm commitment to sustainability. We need counselors who will always remember to embed good policies and environmental sustainability with this wave of rapid economic development. The Town will have to put in place some mechanisms for assessing the economic growth and development success and how it eventually leads to environmental sustainability.

3) Do you believe there are enough transportation options currently available in Windham? If not, do you have ideas or suggestions on how to increase those options?

https://bbcultivation.com/It’s difficult to conclude if the transportation options are enough or not. I assumed the Town of Windham is in transition, from residents using personal vehicles for daily commute to the introduction of “Lakes Region Explorer Bus Service along 302 from Portland to Bridgton,” with stops in Windham. I strongly believed with the Metro Bus connection and Shuttle Bus-ZOOM transfer; hopefully many residents would take advantage of public transport.

4) What are your thoughts regarding the proposed Windham Community Center?

Is it important to our town? Why or why not? If you are for a community center, where do you propose it be built?
It is very important for Windham to build public facilities that residents can utilize. It will be a smart idea to build a community center that would be useful to serve many purposes in the town including community meetings, senior citizens activities and general community entertainment activities. As regarding location, that is up to the planning /zoning board. I will recommend it be at a position that is accessible to all Windham residents.

5) What is the best way for Windham residents to contact you?
Phone # 207-572-5046



September 27, 2019

New laws championed by Sen. Diamond take effect


AUGUSTA — A number of new laws sponsored and supported by Sen. Bill Diamond, D-Windham, took effect on Sept. 19. Maine people will begin to benefit from new laws that keep our roads safer, support veterans and help farmers.

“I’m proud of the work we were able to accomplish this year,” said Sen. Diamond. “There’s always more to be done, but we have made great progress toward a safer, more prosperous Maine.”

An overview of laws sponsored and supported by Sen. Diamond is available below:

FOR DRIVERS
Sen. Diamond, who serves as chair of the Legislature’s Transportation Committee, introduced several new laws to make Maine roads safer for everyone:

Hands-free electronic devices: A new law from Sen. Diamond prohibits the use of handheld electronic devices while driving, ensuring that drivers’ attention stays on the road. The new law allows for devices to be used in hands-free mode, while attached to the dash of the car, or to call emergency services.

“Move Over” law strengthened: Another new law from Sen. Diamond strengthens the “Move Over” law, which requires motorists to slow down and move over when passing a police, emergency or public service vehicle that is pulled over with its lights on.

FOR FARMERS
Mainers Feeding Mainers: This new law from Senate President Troy Jackson, D-Allagash, renews the Mainers Feeding Mainers program, which funds a partnership between local farms and food banks to reduce food insecurity.

Local food for schools: This new law from Sen. Eloise Vitelli, D-Arrowsic, will encourage public schools in Maine to buy and serve more local produce. It’s good for farmers and the economy, providing markets for Maine growers and producers, reducing transportation costs and keeping more Maine food dollars in our own communities. It is also good for kids: It exposes them to a variety of new, fresh, healthy, nutritious food; connects them to local farmers and expands their understanding of where food comes from before it hits their plate.

FOR VETERANS
Providing new opportunities to honor vets: A new law from Senate President Jackson allows Maine people to donate moose-hunting permits to servicemen and women.

Creating veteran-friendly workplaces: Another new law allows veterans to take time off from work to attend medical appointments.

Working to reduce veteran homelessness: Lawmakers passed funding for organizations working in our communities to give veterans the tools they need to get back on their feet.